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October 27, 2010

Comments

PJ Mullen

Aside from loving to focus on the negative there are unfortunately still far to many bad examples of fatherhood out there for the media to focus on. I've maintained the opinion that this evolution of fatherhood that we are experiencing will take another generation to take shape. Fathers like yourself, our mutual friend C.C. and the other fine gentlemen we met at M3 are great examples for our children and our children's children of what a father should be like. It is frustrating that none of us have the answers on how we can do more (including having the ability to slap some sense into the true deadbeats of the world), but what we are doing is a great start. Nice post.

Family Matters

First, I think you've already done more than most, so at least feel a little better.

Second, writing like this and having a following IS doing something important, so feel a little better still.

Third, helping nice Jewish people meet for cocktails is admirable, but only if they're nice (oh, and the link to that isn't, um, linked).

Finally, there is no limit to what you can do once you put your mind to it, so just keep that focus (or foc.us, whichever) and keep looking. Social ripples are powerful forces, although they are very unpredictable, but if you keep "making waves" around the topic of man's (dad's) position in society and attitude towards life, something is likely to catch on.

Good luck,
Gal

Lpfischer.wordpress.com

I see two parallel trends: a strong growth in responsible fatherhood, and I'm-going-to-be-a-15-yo-forever. To start with the latter: there's a group of adult boys out there who just refuse to grow up or to adopt the behaviour or responsibilities of an adult. They've grown up with mothers doing everything, with a constant high level of service, and now they expect that to continue forever. As a result, they are not really looking for partners, they are looking for women to be substitute mothers to them. Not surprisingly, their relationships usually do not last, and being a father is entirely alien.

But there's also a trend for men to become more involved in their families, to be equal partners in all things. To share running a household, raising kids, and being responsible for family affairs. We see men taking more and more parental leave, staying home when kids are sick, leaving work early to pick up kids, and in general share responsibility rather than being assistants to their wifes. This is a process of changing social expectation - in the family, in the workplace, in business, everywhere. It's a slow process, but I see signs we're making progress on many fronts.

I'm hopeful that this trend is leading to better fathers for most kids. I wish there would be support from policy makes, more drive, but the progress is there anyhow.

Financial Help

Single dads are still getting a bad rap. Unfortunately the only thing that we can do about it is to make sure that we are setting an example rather than being an example. I personally don't understand how any parent could not step up and take responsibility for their kids.

financial help for single dads

single dad

Hi there I just drop by your post because I'm searching some information to help me out with my situation. Anyway, I'm a single dad of 2 age 5 and 3 I'm so glad to drop by your blog. I really enjoyed reading your every post. Thanks for sharing this I really appreciate the effort.

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  • Eric Elkins brings more than a decade of writing, marketing, ePR, social media, and educational expertise to his clients.

    A former teacher and corporate trainer, Elkins spent six years as youth content editor at the Denver Newspaper Agency. He then became co-founder and publisher of Bias Media, a multiplatform media engine owned by the parents of the Rocky Mountain News and Denver Post. His model for reaching the elusive 21-34 market combined a print magazine, a website, events, text messaging and email marketing to build an integrated online/real world community. His experience at BIAS led to his role as New Media Practices Manager at Metzger Associates, a PR and venture strategies firm, where he incubated development of Mocapay, a mobile commerce company. Elkins transitioned from Metzger to become VP of Marketing at Mocapay before leaving to found WideFoc.us, a social media strategies agency, in 2007.

    He blogs about being a single father and has written several books. His Twitter handle is @datingdad.

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